astoldbygigi:

BlackMediaNewsReport - We finally have obtained hospital photos of the Atlanta baseball coach who was charged in the 2009 rape of a 9 year old boy. The coach visited the home of the child to encourage him to join the local team. The child refused to join. When the coach left, the child repeatedly told his mother how he did not feel comfortable with the man. Two weeks later, the coach
 returned to the house with food, balloons, and a PlayStation. The child was very excited. Minutes later he joined the team. Four days afterward, the coach came back to the home. He asked the mother if he could give the child private lessons on catching the ball. She agreed. On June 18th, 2009 Atlanta Court documents indicate that the mother heard her son sobbing. She ran into his bedroom and saw the baseball coach having anal sex with the 9 year old. The mother then ran to the kitchen and grabbed a large “turkey carving” knife, and assaulted the coach.  The question we ask our readers is: ” She should have called the police instead of attempting to murder the suspect? ” The police have charged the mother with attempted murder. If convicted she will serve no less than 15 years in state prison under Georgia state laws.

as a victim of sexual assault via father figure, I support this woman’s response. she should get a medal not a trial.
I bet that boy knows beyond a shadow of a doubt that someone is in his corner and looking out for him. What I wouldn’t give for that kind of visceral support and protection. 

astoldbygigi:

BlackMediaNewsReport - We finally have obtained hospital photos of the Atlanta baseball coach who was charged in the 2009 rape of a 9 year old boy. The coach visited the home of the child to encourage him to join the local team. The child refused to join. When the coach left, the child repeatedly told his mother how he did not feel comfortable with the man.

Two weeks later, the coach

returned to the house with food, balloons, and a PlayStation. The child was very excited. Minutes later he joined the team. Four days afterward, the coach came back to the home. He asked the mother if he could give the child private lessons on catching the ball. She agreed.

On June 18th, 2009 Atlanta Court documents indicate that the mother heard her son sobbing. She ran into his bedroom and saw the baseball coach having anal sex with the 9 year old. The mother then ran to the kitchen and grabbed a large “turkey carving” knife, and assaulted the coach.

The question we ask our readers is:

” She should have called the police instead
of attempting to murder the suspect? ”

The police have charged the mother with attempted murder. If convicted she will serve no less than 15 years in state prison under Georgia state laws.

as a victim of sexual assault via father figure, I support this woman’s response. she should get a medal not a trial.

I bet that boy knows beyond a shadow of a doubt that someone is in his corner and looking out for him. What I wouldn’t give for that kind of visceral support and protection. 

theneighbourhoodsuperhero:


Jumah Al-Dossary, a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, politely refuses to answer the interviewer’s question about the specific torture he had to endure during his detainment in Guantanamo Bay. “I prefer not to answer that question… I’ll keep it to myself,” he mutters shyly. He thereafter averts his gaze from the interviewer, ending the conversation.
While still detained, Al-Dossary had confessed to his lawyer Joshua Colangelo-Bryan that what he witnessed (as punishment) at the hands of US guards in Guantanamo after/for complaining to a military physician about the torture he was suffering would always haunt him. Soldiers who heard that he had complained had decided to “teach him a lesson” by blindfolding him and taking him to another part of the Guantanamo Bay camp.

“I heard an Afghan prisoner scream. He was crying and saying, “Oh Allah! Oh God!” That was all he could understand of the man’s screams. He was led toward the screaming, which grew louder and louder, and then his blindfold was pulled off. “I saw an Afghan brother in his fifties. He had a lot of white hair in his beard, and he was tied to the ground. Soldiers were holding on to his shackles, and he was naked lying on his stomach. One of the soldiers was sexually assaulting (sodomising) him. One of the soldiers was videotaping.” Al-Dossary was told that he would face the same fate if he dared to speak out again. (My Guantanamo diary: The detainees and the stories they told me, Khan, M.R.)

The constant stress and fear of physical and psychological abuse and his feelings of helplessness and guilt for not being able to do anything to better the situation of other detainees, such as the detainee he witnessed being raped, drove Al-Dossary into such a deep depression that he attempted suicide seventeen times and his lawyer Colangelo-Bryan reported that he spent most of his meetings with Al-Dossary trying to convince him that he shouldn’t kill himself instead of working on his case.
While imprisoned, Al-Dossary wrote a poem titled “Death Poem.”

Take my blood. Take my death shroud and The remnants of my body. Take photographs of my corpse at the grave, lonely.
Send them to the world, To the judges and To the people of conscience, Send them to the principled men and the fair-minded.
And let them bear the guilty burden before the world, Of this innocent soul. Let them bear the burden before their children and before history, Of this wasted, sinless soul, Of this soul which has suffered at the hands of the “protectors of peace.”
Zoom Info
theneighbourhoodsuperhero:


Jumah Al-Dossary, a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, politely refuses to answer the interviewer’s question about the specific torture he had to endure during his detainment in Guantanamo Bay. “I prefer not to answer that question… I’ll keep it to myself,” he mutters shyly. He thereafter averts his gaze from the interviewer, ending the conversation.
While still detained, Al-Dossary had confessed to his lawyer Joshua Colangelo-Bryan that what he witnessed (as punishment) at the hands of US guards in Guantanamo after/for complaining to a military physician about the torture he was suffering would always haunt him. Soldiers who heard that he had complained had decided to “teach him a lesson” by blindfolding him and taking him to another part of the Guantanamo Bay camp.

“I heard an Afghan prisoner scream. He was crying and saying, “Oh Allah! Oh God!” That was all he could understand of the man’s screams. He was led toward the screaming, which grew louder and louder, and then his blindfold was pulled off. “I saw an Afghan brother in his fifties. He had a lot of white hair in his beard, and he was tied to the ground. Soldiers were holding on to his shackles, and he was naked lying on his stomach. One of the soldiers was sexually assaulting (sodomising) him. One of the soldiers was videotaping.” Al-Dossary was told that he would face the same fate if he dared to speak out again. (My Guantanamo diary: The detainees and the stories they told me, Khan, M.R.)

The constant stress and fear of physical and psychological abuse and his feelings of helplessness and guilt for not being able to do anything to better the situation of other detainees, such as the detainee he witnessed being raped, drove Al-Dossary into such a deep depression that he attempted suicide seventeen times and his lawyer Colangelo-Bryan reported that he spent most of his meetings with Al-Dossary trying to convince him that he shouldn’t kill himself instead of working on his case.
While imprisoned, Al-Dossary wrote a poem titled “Death Poem.”

Take my blood. Take my death shroud and The remnants of my body. Take photographs of my corpse at the grave, lonely.
Send them to the world, To the judges and To the people of conscience, Send them to the principled men and the fair-minded.
And let them bear the guilty burden before the world, Of this innocent soul. Let them bear the burden before their children and before history, Of this wasted, sinless soul, Of this soul which has suffered at the hands of the “protectors of peace.”
Zoom Info

theneighbourhoodsuperhero:

Jumah Al-Dossary, a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, politely refuses to answer the interviewer’s question about the specific torture he had to endure during his detainment in Guantanamo Bay. “I prefer not to answer that question… I’ll keep it to myself,” he mutters shyly. He thereafter averts his gaze from the interviewer, ending the conversation.

While still detained, Al-Dossary had confessed to his lawyer Joshua Colangelo-Bryan that what he witnessed (as punishment) at the hands of US guards in Guantanamo after/for complaining to a military physician about the torture he was suffering would always haunt him. Soldiers who heard that he had complained had decided to “teach him a lesson” by blindfolding him and taking him to another part of the Guantanamo Bay camp.

“I heard an Afghan prisoner scream. He was crying and saying, “Oh Allah! Oh God!” That was all he could understand of the man’s screams. He was led toward the screaming, which grew louder and louder, and then his blindfold was pulled off. “I saw an Afghan brother in his fifties. He had a lot of white hair in his beard, and he was tied to the ground. Soldiers were holding on to his shackles, and he was naked lying on his stomach. One of the soldiers was sexually assaulting (sodomising) him. One of the soldiers was videotaping.” Al-Dossary was told that he would face the same fate if he dared to speak out again. (My Guantanamo diary: The detainees and the stories they told me, Khan, M.R.)

The constant stress and fear of physical and psychological abuse and his feelings of helplessness and guilt for not being able to do anything to better the situation of other detainees, such as the detainee he witnessed being raped, drove Al-Dossary into such a deep depression that he attempted suicide seventeen times and his lawyer Colangelo-Bryan reported that he spent most of his meetings with Al-Dossary trying to convince him that he shouldn’t kill himself instead of working on his case.

While imprisoned, Al-Dossary wrote a poem titled “Death Poem.”

Take my blood.
Take my death shroud and
The remnants of my body.
Take photographs of my corpse at the grave, lonely.

Send them to the world,
To the judges and
To the people of conscience,
Send them to the principled men and the fair-minded.

And let them bear the guilty burden before the world,
Of this innocent soul.
Let them bear the burden before their children and before history,
Of this wasted, sinless soul,
Of this soul which has suffered at the hands of the “protectors of peace.”